Introducing the Cashmerette Lenox Dress

Edit: The Montgomery dress had to be renamed to the Lenox dress. The url reflects the old name, but I have updated my blog post for the new name.

Let’s get this out of the way… Yes, I tested this. Yes, I received the pattern for free. Yes, I am biased. But seriously, it’s a shirtdress and I was going to be biased toward the pattern anyway. And sure I am biased, because I am friends with Jenny and I’ve tested for Cashmerette for a while. I am biased because the fit with her patterns is usually really good and works for me. I am biased because I get the patterns for free. I dgaf. This dress rocks.

The Lenox shirtdress has so many great features: princess seams in the front and back, a back yoke, a waistband, full collar and collar stand option, gathered or pleated skirt option, banded sleeves, v-neck shaping on the button band, and pockets. My go-to shirtdress before now has been the M6696, which I have made several times before. To be honest, I’ve never quite achieved a great fit there. I’ve gotten a good fit, but not a great fit. There are some issues I have with the pattern overall. The side-seam pockets are really shallow and the one time I used them I almost replaced them afterwards because my phone fell out. The back of the dress is pretty puffy due to the gathers. I’ve always meant to go back and alter that part, but generally forget. I also don’t really love the shape of the button band with the collar. If you button it all the way, the collar chokes a bit. In comparison, M7084, which I used for my wedding dress, is a bit closer to what I want in a shirtdress, but my fit on that was still not great and again the collar was a bit high. The Lenox dress sort of hits all my wants in a shirtdress. I was sick at the time I tested it, but could not say no to doing it so I powered through.

The yoke is sewn on using a burrito method and there is an inside waistband for two really great finishes to make the insides pretty. A shirtdress with these details is a time-consuming creation, but completely worth every second you spend on it.

For my tester version, I used the full collar with the gathered skirt. I did french seams throughout except for the sleeves. I find that can be a bit difficult and wasn’t worth my trouble for the tester version. I finished the seams at the armholes with pinking sheers. I made the dress using a white cotton that I got from a friend purging her stash.

After I was done testing, I put the dress on a hanger and left it unhemmed for a bit. I didn’t really feel keen to wear a plain white shirtdress in spite of the fact that when I started I wanted just that. I decided it would need something for me, the colour nut, to wear it comfortably.

Then Ciara posted about the beading she added to her dress. Add to that, all the embroidery I was obsessing over through pinterest and instagram. I kept pinning designs of varying levels of difficultly. I decided to use a variegated embroidery floss in all the colours and do very simple lines of Xs along the collar, arm bands, waistband and hem, as well as using the floss to put the buttons on with an X as well. At first, I was going to do two lines of the Xs at the hem, but several hours later and a pair of sore arms, I just left it at one line. The embroidery details are subtle and lovely. It gives it enough of a pop of colour that I don’t feel like I am wearing a plain white dress.

I'm really excited about how this is turning out. #embroidery #sewing #sewcialists

A post shared by Andie W. (@sewprettyinpink) on

I’m really happy with how it turned out and want to make a few dozen more. I wish I had a crazy fabric budget right now since I want linen like crazy to make another version. I’m going through a linen fabric obsession right now. It’s just so lovely to work with and wear.

Cashmerette Montgomery Shirtdress

Cashmerette Montgomery Shirt dress

Cashmerette Montgomery Shirtdress

Cashmerette Montgomery Shirtdress

Cashmerette Montgomery Shirtdress

Cashmerette Montgomery Shirtdress

Cashmerette Montgomery Shirtdress

I will say that the pictures here are showing weird fit issues that don’t actually exist. I had just cleaned a bunch and was all sore and red from that. I may not have buttoned it correctly since my fingers tend to have issues after cleaning.

This picture taken this morning reflects the bust fit better:

20170515_074013

There is some rippling along the princess seams, likely from doing french seams and not getting it flat enough.

Expect to see several more versions of this dress  on the blog. I’m getting through my large UFO piles right now, though. Some things in that pile have lingered for almost a year. I got through a bunch of things this weekend and am still working my way through it. Let’s just say the pile is deep…

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29 thoughts on “Introducing the Cashmerette Lenox Dress

  1. The dress is fantastic on you and the coloured x-stitches are a great touch. A tip for next time–it looks like you may not have separated the floss before stitching. If you separate them then put them back together again, they’ll lie nice and flat and have a bit more of a sheen. 🙂

  2. Love this!! I really want to make this pattern because its adorable, but quite honestly its a bit fancy for my every day life (thanks New Mexico!). I’m torn….. I need an event so I have an excuse to make it!! Yours is so cute and the white with multicolored detail will make it easy to wear with anything.

    • Thanks, Megan! 🙂 It’s funny because I wear dresses like this all the time and just consider it a casual day dress and not at all fancy. lol. Everyone has a different perspective. 😀

  3. Well you know I love that embroidery, haha! I actually thought you’d used some kind of very narrow insertion lace when I first saw the pics on IG, until I realized it was really colorful and remembered the in-progress photo from before. xD It’s such a fun pop of color and is totally unique to you and this dress.

    It’s great that this pattern includes so many thoughtful details for a professional finish (inner yoke AND waistband!!); I’m sure it will be popular, especially with beautiful examples like yours out there!

    • Thanks, Abbey! 😀 😀 I do love the colours. I think this dress will definitely be the M6696 for the “curvy” sphere. I’m sure it will make people outside of the size range a bit envious. 😉

  4. Another winner Andie! The embroidery is simple, but so fun, and brings a really special touch to a white dress. And yes, I am just outside Cashmerette’s size range, and I’m not even a shirt dress girl, and I’m a bit envious. She’s obviously got a good thing going on.

  5. I said it on insta and I’ll say it again here – I love this so much. I love the pattern and the specific make is so perfect on you.

    I have been thinking a lot about what my platonic shirtdress looks like and this is very close! Very very close. I am excited to make one myself. And a linen one sounds like an absolute dream!

  6. I thought your embroidery was hemstitching in the photos and it looks amazing! I love the cross stitches and how well this dress fits you. Nice job. g

  7. What a gorgeous dress for a picnic! You know I love the teal cardigan with it. 😀 Those x stitches really add a lot of depth. The far away pictures of it almost look like lace insertion or those fancy fagoted seams they do on really nice linen.

    • Thanks, Elizabeth. I just need a picnic to go to. 😉 I’d love to try fagoted seams sometime in the future. It’s such a pretty look. For now, this small project was enough. 🙂

  8. Pingback: Me Made May 2017 Round up, Summary, and Plans | Sew Pretty in Pink

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